Liechtenstein

Andre Thomkins

When I was in Liechtenstein, I went to the Modern Art museum there. I was really impressed with the quality of the museum, especially in such a small country. They had a special exhibition about Swiss artist André Thomkins (whose estate had donated his works to the museum). I hadn't come across him before, but I really enjoyed what I saw (and his large array of German puns), especially the short film where he was talking and demonstrating how he made marbled paintings by floating lacquer on top of water, something he started experimenting with after washing a brush he'd been painting furniture with.... Read More...

Liechtenstein

In other old photos I've dug out recently, here's some photos of Liechtenstein from last summer. I'm currently writing a zine about that trip, so I'm not going to go into a lot of detail here. Liechtenstein is a very weird place. It's one of the smallest countries in Europe, and is essentially a small Swiss town that is a separate country by historical accident, and now stays a separate country because they have a nice income from being a corporate tax haven. The entire country has one high school. I was working at a school just across the border in Austria, and there were a fair few students from Liechtenstein at the school. The capital Vaduz has a small parliament building, an impressive castle, a small museum like that of any small town, a really big and impressive modern art museum, a big post office that does a roaring trade in souvenir stamps and a town square with some expensive cafes and assorted useful shops. There's, Schaan, a suburban town where most people live, a couple of other villages and a big supermarket, some lovely mountains and that's the whole country really. I saw pretty much most of it in an afternoon, which you can't say for most countries.... Read More...

Travels Without My Aunt

I've spent most of the past month travelling around Germany and Austria teaching. It's for an extra-curricular school programme. You do activities to boost the children's speaking confidence in English, work on creative projects, and put on a show for the parents with presentations of the projects, and drama written by the students. You don't need to speak German to do the job, and you never speak German in the classroom, but of course it comes in useful to understand if the kids are being naughty, and in your time outside the classroom.... Read More...