History

60s slides of Herculaneum

When clearing out my grandparents' house a couple of years ago I found seven packets of these 60s tourist slides of various places around the Mediterranean. I've been scanning and restoring them. First up, these from Herculaneum. Herculaneum is a smaller coastal town near Pompeii that was also destroyed by the volcano. It's not as well known, but there are some magnificent villas there in a similar but smaller archaeological park to the one you can visit at Pompeii.... Read More...

Professor Knatschke

My university library had a massive stack of printing industry annuals from the 1890s through to the 20s. I always enjoyed looking through them because the illustrations and articles they chose to showcase new printing technologies were often really odd, and were good to photocopy for collages and zines. Next to them on the shelf was a strange little book called Professor Knatschke. It's a comedy book written and illustrated in 1912 by Alsatian satirist Jean-Jacques Waltz, aka Hansi, about a clueless German professor and his daughter's trip to Paris, mocking both the French and the Germans (but mostly the Germans) in a more innocent pre-WW1 pre-Nazi era. I always really liked the illustrations (and Elsa K's obsession with making gifts embroidered with "inspiring" mottoes) , and now it's available free online as a copyright-free ebook.... Read More...

Red Lead & Choleric Humours

In the days when I worked at Hampton Court I got to go to quite a few of their special events. They had a roster of actors who could portray the various monarchs who had lived at the palace (and two Henry VIIIs) and would do special days with re-enactments based on various time periods or themes. On one of the days they had a day based on science in the time of Charles II. I found some photos when I was tidying up the computer the other day.... Read More...

DDR Museum

I'm fascinated by the history of the Cold War. Both the political side, and the social history of people's everyday lives. I've always been extra fascinated by the former DDR, both because I can speak the language and because they tried so hard to be a "model" Iron Curtain society. You read about people being "internal emigrés". Being a good comrade and worker on the surface, but internally escaping to their own world via drink or just plain daydreaming. I suppose that's what I'd do in the situation. I have a lot of thoughts on the subject, but I'm currently writing a zine about the trip this summer, so I'll save them for there.... Read More...

Starkes Viertel- photos of Dresden Neustadt in the 70s and 80s

When I was in Dresden, I bought a photography book by a local photographer. Günter Starke lived in Dresden Neustadt, the area just across the river from the historical centre, in the 70s and 80s, and took a lot of photos. Despite the name, Neustadt is full of old buildings that escaped bombing during the war (it's only new compared to the baroque city centre), and in the communist days, the local council concentrated on building blocks of flats and housing estates to house families.... Read More...

Petrie Museum

Earlier today I met up with my friend Chloe on her way up to Glasgow, and we went to the Souzou exhibition with her old flatmates. When she went to catch the train, I decided to fit in a visit to the Petrie Museum round the corner in UCL too, which I hadn't been to for a long time. (I tried to say hi to Jeremy too, but his box was closed).... Read More...

Rooflines

These are from some photos I took in Whitstable a few weeks ago, a pretty oyster fishing town in Kent (and sometimes *too* popular with the daahn from londons for the taste of the locals). The roofline of the school took my fancy.... Read More...